Polaroid Land Camera Guide

Polaroid Land cameras are named after Edwin Land who was the inventor of the instant film camera, which was manufactured by Polaroid. All Polaroid instant cameras were called “Land” cameras until 1982 when Edwin Land retired.

This guide applies to the “packfilm” versions of Polaroid Land cameras which includes series 100-400 and were manufactured from 1963 to the mid 70s. Previous Land Camera models used a different type of film called roll film and a guide for that type of camera can be found here.

Polaroid stopped producing packfilm in 2009, leaving Fujifilm as the only manufacturer until 2016. There is still a supply of film out there but it is quickly diminishing and the prices are rising. Fortunately there are some photo labs that are currently trying to recreate the process of manufacturing this type  of Polaroid packfilm.

My first Land Camera in this style was the model 100, which was the first model ever produced. I found it at an antique store for 20 dollars and was so excited because it was my dream camera.  I managed to get it to work and have taken plenty of photos with it. Over the years I have collected quite a few different models at various thrift and antique stores because it’s my favorite type of vintage camera. I just can never pass them up!

Land Cameras can also be bought refurbished online for a higher price, but they’re guaranteed to work unlike the ones found second hand. Thrift store cameras can be a bit of a risk because you never know if it will work or not. But for me that’s all part of the fun!

I love this camera because it is such a classic vintage camera and still takes great photos over 50 years later. I have always loved the way film photos look and Polaroid film is magical with its instant developing. It still amazes me that these old cameras can still just pop out a beautiful film print.

This guide applies to the 100 series through the 400 series, although there may be some features of the later models that are not covered here.

Remove the Case 

If you’re lucky enough to find a camera that still has its case, unlatch it from the top of the camera to fold it down. Press the metal clip underneath to remove it. In some models the view finder will need to be flipped up.  In other models it stays up all the time.

 

Extend the Bellows

To extend the camera bellows press upwards on this arrow. Pull the bellows out gently until a click is heard and they slide into place.

 

Retract the Bellows

It’s a good idea to make sure the rollers are clean each time a new pack of film is placed inside. Otherwise chemicals will build up on them and make it difficult to pull the photos out.

The rollers are released by pressing the red clip and pulling the rollers up.

Use a damp paper towel to wipe them clean. If there are chemicals that are caked on really well, then a little bit of rubbing alcohol on a Q tip usually does the trick.

 

Open the Back

 Press down on the lever found on the bottom of the camera to pop open the back.

The inside of the camera should be clean and free of any tears or rips. Any rips of tears will provide a way for light to enter the camera and overexpose the film.

 

Clean the Rollers

It’s a good idea to make sure the rollers are clean each time a new pack of film is placed inside. Otherwise chemicals will build up on them and make it difficult to pull the photos out.

The rollers are released by pressing the red clip and pulling the rollers up.

Use a damp paper towel to wipe them clean. If there are chemicals that are caked on really well, then a little bit of rubbing alcohol on a Q tip usually does the trick.

 

 Test the Shutter

Engage the shutter by pressing down the lever labeled number three on the front of the camera.

 Release the shutter by pressing the red button labeled number two.

If the battery is working, two distinct clicks will be heard and the shutter can be seen opening and closing if the back of the camera remains open.  If these two clicks are not heard then there is something wrong with the battery connection and shutter will not open so a photo will not be taken.

Most old Polaroid Land Cameras found in thrift shops and antique stores will contain an old corroded battery.  There are still replacement batteries like this that can be found, but the easiest thing to do is replace the old battery with three AAA batteries.

A cheap mini flashlight has the perfect apparatus for converting the old land camera’s battery system.

This is done by connecting the white and black tabs to the flashlight battery holder. A quick fix is taping it all together with electrical tape. A permanent fix is by sodering.  In some cameras the flashlight apparatus will not fit inside so you may have to break off some plastic pieces in the battery compartment to make it fit.  That is what I did in the picture above, you can spot the jagged edges!

FujiFilm, until recently made new film for Polaroid Land cameras in color and black and white. Although it is now discontinued, the limited supply can still be purchased. Original, expired Land Camera film can still be found occasionally on eBay.

The film pack is loaded by placing it into the back of the camera. Make sure all the paper parts are aligned and not folded over before closing the back.

 

Film Speed

The film speed settings are 75, 150, 300 and 3000. 75 is a good place to keep it on because the color film is speed 100 and 75 is the closet to 100.

 

Lighting

 

Use the blue tab along the bottom the select the light setting. I usually keep mine selected for bright sun/dull day, unless it’s really bright outside.

Exposure

Twisting the ring around the lens adjust the aperture. In darker settings the camera should be set to lighten, in bright settings the camera should be set to darken.

Focus

The focus is adjusted by pressing or pulling the two tabs labeled 1.  This adjusts the below length of the bellows and brings the image into focus.

Adjusting the bellows is done while simultaneously looking through the little circular viewfinder to the left of the big viewfinder. There is a line that cuts the image in half, and they will line up perfectly when focused.

Once the image is lined up and in focus, engage the shutter by pressing the lever labeled 3, then snap the photograph by press down on the shutter release button labeled 2.

If the two clicks are heard, the photograph was taken!

 

Pull on the numbered tab to advance the negative part of the film. This causes the negative to make contact with the positive part of the film and bring the next negative forward in front of the lens.

The image is still inside the camera at this point.

To remove the picture from the camera, grasp the black tab and pull it out with a a firm and steady motion. Make sure it is pulled out straight and not at an angle which could cause a jam, or affect the development process.

The rollers work to spread the development chemicals across the image as it is pulled through, and to begin the development process.

On the side of the film is a developing time guide based on the ambient temperature. Although the fujifilm apparently has no maximum development time so it is ok the leave it for longer than it says.  However if you are using old expired film it’s best not to leave it to develop for too long.

After the recommended waiting time, peel the film apart and admire your polaroid picture!!

 

The flash clips onto the top of the camera and the wire plugs into the front. The flash will fire automatically when it is plugged in. To switch to taking photos without flash, just unplug it.

Flash bulbs can be found on eBay or at antique stores if you’re lucky enough to stumble upon them.

The bulb screws into the flash apparatus, and once it fires, it can be ejected by pressing the red button on top of the flash.

The bulbs are hot and partially melted once fired. Be careful!!

See a collection of some of my polaroids HERE.

Tell me about your Land Camera adventures!

 

 

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Cat Photos Friday #72- Camera Photo shoot Invasion

I set my Land camera up to take photos of for a guide I’m writing, and Cloud thought she should be included in the pictures.

Then Chester joined in and Cloud did not hide her distaste.

Look at that eye roll!


Happy Weekend!

Land Camera Photo Shoot

 
I have been working on fixing up my polaroid land cameras. Getting them all cleaned, restoring their batteries and writing a little user guide. Then I got inspired to do a photo shoot with my first and favorite one, and before I knew what was happening, I had a whole 1960s thing going on.


And maybe it was because I have watched a little too much Mad Men, but I couldn’t seem to take a photo without having a crabby expression..







I sure do love this camera and I can’t wait to share more about it soon!  I also can’t wait to find some vintage clothes to fuel this new 60s vibe I’ve been feeling.

A Year in Land Camera Photos

About a year ago I found this vintage polaroid land camera on a thrifting trip. I had been wanting one for a while, but wasn’t ready to spend a couple hundred bucks on a restored one.  I luckily found this baby in great condition for 20 dollars! All I had to do was replace the battery and now it works great! I even found this flash for it a few months ago.

 Fujifilm still makes film to fit it and I wanted to share the photos I have taken in this past year. There aren’t a whole lot, due to some tragic film jams I ended up losing quite a bit of film. 😦

This is the first photo I took with it (that came out!)  I forgot to focus, however..

We spent a weekend in the mountains last spring and I snapped this view from our motel.


We took a trip to a dairy farm last summer and I brought my regular camera, but forgot my battery at home!  I was so mad, but I luckily I brought my land camera with me! I think a land camera photo is worth about 100 digital photos.



From our beach trip. I forgot to focus again.. But I kind of like the dreamy out of focus look.

My Mom’s haunted house.
Christmas day. This is where I realized the camera shouldn’t be used indoors unless you have a flash. Surprisingly this was a bright and sunny morning!

This was taken with my new flash bulbs!

And this is my latest photo which I am very excited about. I tried to take a picture of the house, but didn’t hear the click of the shutter so I thought it didn’t work. I took it inside to look at it and then I took a test shot of the backyard, (because a neighbor had come outside in the front of the house, and I didn’t want them to see me of course!) And it turned out the shutter had worked the first time and I ended up with this amazing double exposure!

I definitely want to take a whole bunch more land photos this year, I just love the way they look!

Land Camera Model 95 Tutorial

One of the highlights of my birthday adventure back in February, was finding this antique land camera.

I’ve had a fascination with polaroid cameras ever since I saw my uncle using one on a beach trip when I was eight years old. I just knew I had to have my own. For my birthday the following year I got an izone camera, and two packs of film. It made tiiiny little photos and I had a blast taking pictures of my pets and my toys. But eventually I used up all the film and for whatever reason never got any more. I never did get a real polaroid camera like I wanted and early this year I discovered the polaroid land camera and knew that was the camera I needed. Not only was it a super neat vintage camera, but you could still take pictures with it! So imagine my surprise when I happen to stumble upon one the next day.

Since finding this particular camera I have learned quite a few things about it that I wanted to share!

You can collapse the camera and the lens folds up to give you a handy way of carrying it around. This is mainly to protect to lens but it’s also convenient  if you don’t want people staring at you while you lug around a bulky 70 year old camera.


To open it you just press the silver button at the top and drag the lens out until it clicks into place.

Closing it is a bit more difficult though, you have to press down on the metal bars towards the back and then force the lens to slide back in. I’m sure it worked great back in the day when it was new, but it’s a struggle to get it back in now. Especially if you’re out in public and trying to rush to put away before it prompts someone to come over and ask you a bunch of questions! (Oh the horror!)



The inventor of this camera was Edwin Land and it was the first instant film camera ever made.  I read a story that said one day his daughter asked him why she couldn’t see the photos he took right away, and that led him to develop this instant camera that was manufactured by polaroid. The polaroid company dropped “Land” from their camera names in 1983 when Edwin Land retired. 

The one I happen to find was the first ever model of the land camera which was produced in 1947! Unfortunately these older models take what is called rollfilm, which stopped being produced in 1992. 😦 


However you can still find the film on ebay if you’re lucky!  It’s a gamble buying expired film though, because you have no idea if it will actually work or not until you try it.  It takes polaroid 200 roll film, and it can also take polaroid 3000 rollfilm but since it’s such a fast speed I think I read that you need a special filter for it.. I haven’t gotten around to messing with that part yet.



To load the film you have to completely unfold the camera

Pressing the long button will open up the first hinged flap of the camera



And flipping this switch will open up the rest

 When you open a pack of film you will find two rolls, one is the negative film, one is the the positive film and they are attached together with some ancient scotch tape.  DO NOT BREAK THE SCOTCH TAPE. There are directions on the back that show how to load it; the negative roll goes on the right side,  the positive roll goes on the left side and the wrapper wraps around the first hinged flap and a small portion of it should be hanging out once you completely close the camera.

Gently tug on the wrapper to pull it out. It will be about 15 inches long and then it will stop. This means the first exposure is in front of the lens and you are ready to attempt a photograph!

There are a just a few settings you’ll need to adjust before taking a photo. The most important is the aperture, which is done by rotating the knob shown above. The numbers range from 1-8; One being the largest aperture and eight being the smallest. The larger the aperture the more light it lets in, so a low aperture setting is good for shooting indoors and a high aperture setting is best for bright sunlight outdoors. As you turn the knob you can see the aperture changing, which is great way to check to make sure you have the setting right.

The next setting to adjust is the length of the lens, depending on how far away your subject is. This is easily done by just sliding the lens forward or backward.


And then you’re ready to take a picture! Just press down on the shutter button and the aperture opens to expose the film.

The image will not start to develop until it is pulled through the rollers which release the chemicals. To do this, you press the film release button which is the little round button on the back of them camera. After you press it, pull the roll of paper until it stops; the photo you just took should now be in the back of the camera and the development process has started. The box of film says to wait about a minute or so, but since the film is super old I usually wait about three to five minutes before opening the back of the camera to get the picture out.


Once the time is up you can open up the back of the camera and get your photo. Just grab the little triangle tab and pull it off.


However, using expired film that is over 20 years old is risky and more often than not, will not work out! The picture above shows the remnants of an entire roll of film that did not work out.

I have actually managed to take one photo! It was the first roll of film I ever tried and it took me a while to realize that the negative roll had broken away from the positive roll (Remember that very important piece of ancient scotch tape I mentioned above?!) Well the tape had ripped apart by itself so I was only pulling the positive roll of film through and my photos weren’t developing. Once I realized what the problem was I was able to take this photo, but it just happened to be the very last exposure on the roll. This was a particular bummer because I bet I could have gotten an entire roll of photos if I had realized the problem sooner. -_-

But that’s ok, I’m still amazed I was able to even take one! It’s of my plants on my windowsill, I was a little annoyed at myself at first that I didn’t take a photo of something more interesting, but then I remember that the first photo ever taken was out a window so I thought it seemed kind of fitting.



My reaction to a bad exposure covered in old goopy chemicals. 

I am determined to take at least one more good photo with this camera!

Antique Store Finds

One of our favorite Saturday activities is to go thrifting/antiquing. There’s a couple good thrift stores in my area, but there are waay more antique stores and lately we have been visiting them regularly and finding some really great stuff. For years I’d always assumed that everything in antique stores was expensive and I never really thought to add any to our thrifting list. Boy was I wrong!

This is our haul from our latest antiquing trip

I seem to be the land camera queen lately,  I have been finding them everywhere! The first shop we went in was owned by santa claus type character, and he asked what we were looking for. I’m usually awkward and just mumble something and dart away to avoid conversations, but Steven told him I was interested in cameras. He got a huge smile on his face and said “Well you’re gonna looovvveee me!”  And brought me over to a shelf overflowing with old cameras, many of which were land cameras!  I actually didn’t buy any cameras from him though, even though I kind of wanted to. The land cameras were pretty old and nothing had price tags. I hate asking prices because I don’t want to feel pressured to buy something, plus it would involve talking to someone (Oh the horror!!)

This land camera came from one of the next shops we went into. I couldn’t believe it; it was the exact model I was thinking of buying refurbished online for 200$. It’s the first model to use packfilm which is still made brand new! Once again it had no price tag, but Steven asked the lady who owned the shop, who has a very strong personality and I can never quite figure out if she’s mad at us or that’s just how she acts. She responded with “Oh you want my camera? Well it’s 20 bucks!” and then walked away. I held in a squeal and knew it was mine!! We also bought an aluminum butter dish from her that she was asking like 8 bucks for. Steven talked her down to 5 and she reluctantly agreed . She seemed to think the butter dish was more special than the camera and told us we were getting it for a steal!

We got this globe from my absolute favorite antique store! We saw it there months ago but didn’t buy it. Steven had been thinking about it ever since so we went back to see if it was still there. We didn’t see it and asked the owner and he said he was pretty sure he sold it. After we left he came chasing us down the street and said he had found the globe! 



I sneakily took some photos of the place, and didn’t even realize until just now that I had taken a picture of the globe we were looking for! This place is FILLED with books! He also has a nice collection of bonsai pots and cameras, so I could spend hours in his shop. I saw a land camera here too, but once again no price tag and since I had just bought one I figured I should calm down with the camera buying. Haha.

Something I’d like to do is take more pictures of antique stores. When I was little my parents went to antique stores all the time and would spend what felt like days in there. It didn’t bother me too much though, I have always loved the kind of eerie feeling they have and love to get lost wandering through the rows of forgotten memories. 


Well, I certainly never imagined I would have this much to say about this post! I just couldn’t resist sharing all the interactions we had that day.